Innovation Igniter serves as a roundup of some of the most popular news and commentary in the fields of product design and development, from high-tech and electronics to automotive to medical devices. This week, we cover Ford’s partnership with Qualcomm in the move toward a future of autonomous vehicles, the launch of Amazon Go, and Medgadget’s top picks for med-tech showcased at CES 2018.

high-tech

Ford Taps Qualcomm to Ensure Cars can Talk to Everything Else

Autonomous car news from CES 2018: Ford and chipmaker Qualcomm revealed they are partnering to create cellular vehicle-to-everything (C2VX) technology. An important part of autonomous vehicles, the technology is intended to help cars connect and communicate well with smart traffic lights, roads, street signs, etc.

high-tech

Amazon Go, a High-Tech Version of a 7-Eleven, will Finally Open on Monday — with No Checkout Lines and No Cashiers

No more lines. Amazon has officially opened its first brick and mortar convenience store, called “Amazon Go.” Making a “convenience” store even more convenient, Amazon Go employs technology (such as a number of cameras along the ceiling, shelf sensors and Amazon’s computer system) that allows customers to leave the store with their items and without having to wait in a checkout line. Shoppers need to download the Amazon Go app, and then scan their phones when entering the store. Then they walk out with their items, and payments take place automatically. This first location is on the ground floor of Amazon’s new Seattle headquarters.

Medgadget’s Best of CES 2018

More CES news: Medgadget highlighted their top picks for medtech at the conference. These included SmartSleep from Philips (enhances sleep quality by optimizing N3, slow-wave, sleep via auditory stimulation), MyEye 2.0 from OrCam (a device for people with sight impairments that transcribes words on a page, grocery items, currency, names of people via facial recognition, etc.), and the My Special Aflac Duck (a robotic duck distributed to pediatric cancer patients for medical play, communicating feelings and enabling guided breathing).


Our Authors: Matt Suits and Andreya Carlson

About The Author: Matt Suits

Matt has always loved interacting with clients to find solutions for their challenges. He was drawn to business development at Kaleidoscope because of the great potential he saw. After graduating from the Lindner College of Business at the University of Cincinnati, he worked with two startups, a marketing consultancy, a financial services company and the non-profit 3CDC. He believes that listening is the most important part of sales. In his free time, Matt enjoys movies, trying new foods, traveling and the great outdoors.

About the Author: Andreya Carlson

Andreya has always been fascinated by language and the written word, which drove her to earn a degree in Journalism from the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism at Ohio University. She additionally earned a degree in Psychology, which kindled her interest in the healthcare industry. Her experience in marketing, communications, writing and editing includes work with a prominent human rights organization in England and a Cincinnati-based book publishing company. Andreya’s appetite for knowledge and passion for purposeful creation led her to cover design and healthcare advancement news for Kaleidoscope.





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